Creating Autonumber Formats for Styles

When you incorporate autonumbering into content, you do so by creating an autonumbering format, which consists of one or more commands. Some examples of commands are: CH:, {n+}, {chapnum}, {b}, and {/b}. In addition, you can add text next to commands. For several samples, see Autonumber Format Examples.

Example You want to apply autonumbering to figure captions. Furthermore, let's say you want the beginning of each caption to contain the word "Figure" followed by the chapter number, a dash, and the next incremented number (e.g., Figure 1-5, Figure 1-6, Figure 1-7). To accomplish this, you might create an autonumbering format that looks like this: CH:Figure {chapnum}-{n+}.

Note It is possible to use autonumbering in online outputs, but only in a limited way. For example, if you have notes throughout your project, you can create an autonumber format on a paragraph style class that simply has the text "Note:" followed by a space. Then whenever you want to apply that style class to note content, it will automatically start with "Note:" so that you don't have to type it each time. However, in the traditional sense where autonumbering is used to increment numbers for elements such as chapters, figures, and tables, it is really only intended for print-based outputs. If you are creating both online and print output and want the autonumbering to be used only for content in the print output, you can use a print medium to specify the autonumbering settings for the print output. See Mediums and Media Queries, Creating Mediums, and Styles for Print Output.

The following steps show you how to create an autonumber format for a style class. This is the recommended method. A style lets you apply the same format to multiple paragraphs throughout your project, and any changes to the format are applied automatically to all the paragraphs using that style. Alternatively, you can create an autonumber format for a single paragraph. For steps see Creating Autonumber Formats for Paragraphs.

Simplified or Advanced View

Complete one of the following sets of steps, depending on whether you want to use the Simplified view or Advanced view in the Stylesheet Editor.

  • Simplified The Simplified view displays styles in a grid view and is often best for brand new users.

    This view provides an easy way to apply properties to styles, with format options available from a toolbar and dialogs (similar to the way one would use an interface such as Microsoft Word). In some cases, only the most common property options are available in the Simplified view (e.g., font, letter/word spacing, paragraph alignment/indentation, autonumbering format, borders, background). One advantage of the Simplified view is that you can apply a property to multiple styles at the same time. You can also click a check box to hide the properties in the editor, allowing you to see only the styles.

  • Advanced The Advanced view displays styles in a tree structure, and despite the name, is user friendly for authors of all levels.

    For the properties, you can toggle between a grouped display and an alphabetical display. The Advanced view of the Stylesheet Editor lets you edit more settings than are available in the Simplified view. In addition, the Advanced view lets you see and apply settings to multiple mediums and media queries at the same time.

How to Create an Autonumber Format for a Style Using the Simplified View

  1. From the Content Explorer, open the stylesheet that you want to modify.
  2. In the local toolbar, make sure the first button displays (which means that the Simplified view is currently shown in the editor). If the button displays instead, then click it.
  3. In the upper-left corner of the Stylesheet Editor, click in the drop-down field and select .
  4. On the left side of the Stylesheet Editor, select the style. Usually, it is a paragraph or heading style (e.g., h1, p.Figure). If you do not yet have a style that you want to use, you can create one. See Creating Selectors.
  5. In the local toolbar of the editor, click . The Properties dialog opens.
  6. Select the Auto-number tab.
  7. (Optional) From the Available commands drop-down list, you can filter the autonumber commands shown in the area below by selecting one of the options.
    • Show All Displays all of the commands in the area below.
    • Show AutoNumber Commands Displays only the autonumber commands in the area below. These include commands such as chapter, section, and volume numbers; counters; and series labels.
      • Chapter, Section, and Volume Number Commands These commands ({chapnum}, {secnum}, {volnum}) let you organize your output into different areas and apply number sequences to them (e.g., Chapter 1, Chapter 2, Chapter 3).
      • Counters are Commands These commands (such as {n}, {n=1}, {n+}, {r}, {A}, and {Gn}) provide information about what types of numbers should be used and how they should be incremented.
      • Series Labels These are prefixes to a format (composed of one or two letters and a colon) that provide a way to limit numbering sequences for different purposes. Although Flare includes H: in the list of available commands, that is simply one example of a series label. The letter that you use as a series label is arbitrary. You can replace H and choose any letter of the alphabet, followed by a colon. The exception to this is a two-letter series label, in which the first letter represents a series that encompasses more than just one topic. For example, CH is an example of a series label that applies across an entire chapter. The H can be replaced with another letter, but you must keep the C in order to use this command. Finally, it's important to note that a series label must always be the first element in an autonumber format.
    • Show File Commands Displays only the file commands in the area below. These include commands that let you incorporate different parts of a file (such as the file name, file path, and file extension) in an autonumber format.
    • Show Format Commands Displays only the format commands in the area below. These include commands such as {b}, {i}, {color red}, and {size 12pt}, which let you determine how an autonumber format will look. Many of these commands require a beginning command (e.g., {b}) and an ending command (e.g., {/b}).
    • Show Page Commands Displays only the page commands in the area below. These let you include the page number and count in an autonumber format.
    • Show Text Commands Displays only the text commands in the area below. These commands let you incorporate text from an area of your output into the autonumber format.
  8. In the Enter format field, provide the autonumber format for the style. This format can be a combination of text that you type and automated commands that you select. To add a command to the "Enter format" field, double-click it from the list in the area below.

    Example If you want the autonumber to include text (such as "Table" or "Figure"), simply type it in this field. You can also double-click any of the commands below to add them to this field. For example, you might want to add a counter that increments the autonumbers by one (e.g., Figure 1, Figure 2, Figure 3). The command for this is {n+}. Descriptions for each command are displayed in the list.

    Some commands include a start tag and an end tag. For example, if you want a portion of the autonumber format be displayed in bold, you would place your cursor in the "Enter format" field where you want to start the bold font and double-click b in the list below. Then place your cursor where you want the bold font to end and double-click /b from the list.

    So in the end, your autonumber format might include a combination of text and multiple commands, such as: {b}Table {n+} - {/b}.

    Following are descriptions of the commands that are available.

    Note If you plan to generate Word output from your project, you should not use the format commands provided in the grid, since they are not supported in Word. Instead, create and apply a span class to the autonumber format to change its look. To create a span class, open the Stylesheet Editor, select the span tag on the left side of the editor, and follow the steps for adding a selector (e.g., span.BoldRed). Then on the style using the autonumber, enter the name of the class in the mc-auto-auto-number-class field.

    So instead of doing this…

    Do this instead…

    Autonumber Commands

    • {n} Retains the current counter value and displays it. You might use this command, for example, if you are applying autonumber formats to multi-level paragraphs, where one paragraph acts as the "parent" to another. Let's say the first-level paragraphs are numbered like this: 1.0, 2.0, 3.0. If you want the second level paragraphs to keep the first number of its parent paragraph and increment the second number (e.g., 1.1, 1.2, 1.3), you would enter the {n} command to continue displaying that first number, which represents the parent paragraph (in this case, 1).
    • {n=1} Resets the counter value to 1 and displays it. You can replace the number 1 with any other number that you want to use.
    • { =0} Resets the counter value to 0 but does not display it. You can replace the number 0 with any other number that you want to use.
    • {n+} Increments the counter value and displays it. You might use this command, for example, to increment a list of step-by-step procedures (e.g., 1., 2., 3.).
    • { } Retains the current value and does not display it. Make sure to include a space between the brackets. You might use this command, for example, if you are creating an outline with Roman numerals at the first level and uppercase alpha numerals at the second level. If you are creating the format for the second level, you want the autonumber format to keep track of the fact that it is a "child" of the first level paragraph, but you do not want to display the Roman numeral from it (e.g., IV.A.). Instead, you only want to display the uppercase alpha letter (e.g., A). In order to do this, you would insert the { } command at the place where the Roman numeral would normally be displayed.
    • {secnum} Displays the current section number. You can use this command if you are creating online output, or Word or PDF output.

      Note To generate section numbers, you need to create an autonumber format that includes the {secnum} command. Then you need to specify section breaks in the outline TOC. See Specifying Chapter and Page Layout Breaks.

      Note You can also insert Section Number variables into page layout headers. By doing this, you can automatically display the correct section number at the top or bottom of pages in the output. See Inserting Chapter, Section, and Volume Number Variables Into Frames.

    • {chapnum} Displays the current chapter number.

      Note To generate chapter numbers, you need to create an autonumber format that includes the {chapnum} command. Then you need to specify chapter breaks in the outline TOC. See Specifying Chapter and Page Layout Breaks.

      Note You can also insert Chapter Number variables into page layout headers. By doing this, you can automatically display the correct chapter number at the top or bottom of pages in the output. See Inserting Chapter, Section, and Volume Number Variables Into Frames.

    • {volnum} Displays the current volume number.

      Note To generate volume numbers, you need to create an autonumber format that includes the {volnum} command. Second, you need to specify chapter breaks in the outline TOC (see Specifying Chapter and Page Layout Breaks). Third, you need to specify the autonumber flow for each volume, resetting the volume number to a specific number (see Specifying Autonumbering Flow for Output).

      Note You can also insert Volume Number variables into page layout headers. By doing this, you can automatically display the correct volume number at the top or bottom of pages in the output. See Inserting Chapter, Section, and Volume Number Variables Into Frames.

    • {r} This is the same as the {n} command, except it displays the counter as a lowercase Roman numeral. You can replace the "n" with an "r" in any of the commands listed above.
    • {R} This is the same as the {n} command, except it displays the counter as an uppercase Roman numeral. You can replace the "n" with an "R" in any of the commands listed above.
    • {a} This is the same as the {n} command, except it displays the counter as a lowercase alpha letter. You can replace the "n" with an "a" in any of the commands listed above.
    • {A} This is the same as the {n} command, except it displays the counter as an uppercase alpha letter. You can replace the "n" with an "A" in any of the commands listed above.
    • {Sn} This is a counter to be used over the course of an entire section. This specific command retains the current counter value and displays it. However, you can modify it to create custom versions of any of the commands that you see above with {n}. For example, you might want to use {Sn+} or {Sn=1}.
    • {Cn} This is a counter to be used over the course of an entire chapter. This specific command retains the current counter value and displays it. However, you can modify it to create custom versions of any of the commands that you see above with {n}. For example, you might want to use {Cn+} or {Cn=1}.
    • {Gn} This is a counter to be used globally in your content. This specific command retains the current counter value and displays it. However, you can modify it to create custom versions of any of the commands that you see above with {n}. For example, you might want to use {Gn+} or {Gn=1}.
    • H: Specifies a series labeled H. However, you can use any letter of the alphabet for a series label, and you can use several different series labels throughout your content. For example, you might want to use F: for a series of figure captions, or T: for a series of table captions. If you use a series label, it must be first in the autonumber format.
    • SH: Specifies a section-wide series labeled H. However, you can use any letter of the alphabet as the second letter (replacing H). For example, you might want to use SF: for a section-wide series of figure captions, or ST: for a section-wide series of table captions. If you use a series label, it must be first in the autonumber format.
    • CH: Specifies a chapter-wide series labeled H. However, you can use any letter of the alphabet as the second letter (replacing H). For example, you might want to use CF: for a chapter-wide series of figure captions, or CT: for a chapter-wide series of table captions. If you use a series label, it must be first in the autonumber format.
    • GH: Specifies a global series labeled H. However, you can use any letter of the alphabet as the second letter (replacing H). For example, you might want to use GF: for a global series of figure captions, or GT: for a global series of table captions. If you use a series label, it must be first in the autonumber format.

    File Commands

    • {ext} Displays the file extension.
    • {file} Displays the file name, including the extension.
    • {filename} Displays the file name, without the extension.
    • {path} Displays the path of the file.
    • {url} Displays the path of the file, URL syntax.

    Format Commands

    • {b} Starts bold text.
    • {/b} Ends bold text.
    • {bg red} Starts new background color. You can replace "red" with another color.
    • {/bg} Ends the background color.
    • {color red} Starts new text color. You can replace "red" with another color.
    • {/color} Ends the text color.
    • {default} Resets all font changes.
    • {family Courier New} Starts a new font family. You can replace "Courier New" with another font family.
    • {/family} Ends font family.
    • {i} Starts italic text.
    • {/i} Ends italic text.
    • {size 12pt} Starts font size. You can replace "12pt" with another font size.
    • {/size} Ends font size.
    • {sub} Starts subscript text.
    • {/sub} Ends subscript text.
    • {sup} Starts superscript text.
    • {/sup} Ends superscript text.
    • {u} Starts underline text.
    • {/u} Ends underline text.

    Page Commands

    • {page} Displays the page number.
    • {pagecount} Displays the page count.

    Text Commands

  9. In the Position field, you can select the position for the autonumber format in the paragraph.

    • Inside Head The autonumber format is placed before the paragraph content, inside the content area. Text that is wrapped to the next line will align under the autonumber format.
    • Outside HeadThe autonumber format is placed before the paragraph content, but outside of the content area. Therefore, text that is wrapped to the next line will align under the previous text (not under the autonumber format). You can provide space between the format and the content by using the "Offset" field.
    • Inside Tail The autonumber format is placed after the paragraph content, inside the content area. Text that is wrapped to the next line will align under the autonumber format.
    • Outside Tail The autonumber format is placed after the paragraph content, but outside of the content area. Therefore, text that is wrapped to the next line will align under the previous text (not under the autonumber format). You can provide space between the format and the content by using the "Offset" field.
    • Float Left The autonumber format is placed to the left of the paragraph content, in alignment with the left side of the page frame.
    • Float Right The autonumber format is placed to the right of the paragraph content, in alignment with the right side of the page frame.
    • Outside Frame The autonumber format is placed outside the page layout frame holding the paragraph.
    • Outside Frame (Left Side) The autonumber format is placed to the left of the page layout frame holding the paragraph.
    • Outside Frame (Right Side) The autonumber format is placed to the right of the page layout frame holding the paragraph.
    • None The autonumber functionality (autonumbers, counters, and formatting) are removed from the class, while the other class properties are preserved.
  10. In the Offset field, you can specify the amount of space that you want to create between a format's content and the paragraph content. Select Length in the top drop-down list. You can then enter an amount and choose from several different units of measurement (points, pixels, centimeters, etc.). See Units of Measurement. Click OK when you are done.
  11. In the Span Class field, you can enter a span style class for the autonumber format.
  12. In the Properties dialog, click OK.
  13. Click to save your work.

How to Create an Autonumber Format for a Style Using the Advanced View

  1. From the Content Explorer, open the stylesheet that you want to modify.
  2. In the local toolbar, make sure the first button displays . If the button displays instead, then click it.

  3. In the upper-left corner of the Stylesheet Editor, click in the drop-down field and select .
  4. On the left side of the Stylesheet Editor, select the style. Usually, it is a paragraph or heading style (e.g., h1, p.Figure). If you do not yet have a style that you want to use, you can create one. See Creating Selectors.
  5. From the Show drop-down list on the upper-right side of the editor, select .
  6. (Optional) You can use the toggle button in the local toolbar to show properties below in a group view or an alphabetical view .
  7. If you are using grouped view, expand the AutoNumber group.
  8. To the right of mc-autonumber-format, click . The Auto-Number Format dialog opens.
  9. (Optional) From the Available commands drop-down list, you can filter the autonumber commands shown in the area below by selecting one of the options.
    • Show All Displays all of the commands in the area below.
    • Show AutoNumber Commands Displays only the autonumber commands in the area below. These include commands such as chapter, section, and volume numbers; counters; and series labels.
      • Chapter, Section, and Volume Number Commands These commands ({chapnum}, {secnum}, {volnum}) let you organize your output into different areas and apply number sequences to them (e.g., Chapter 1, Chapter 2, Chapter 3).
      • Counters are Commands These commands (such as {n}, {n=1}, {n+}, {r}, {A}, and {Gn}) provide information about what types of numbers should be used and how they should be incremented.
      • Series Labels These are prefixes to a format (composed of one or two letters and a colon) that provide a way to limit numbering sequences for different purposes. Although Flare includes H: in the list of available commands, that is simply one example of a series label. The letter that you use as a series label is arbitrary. You can replace H and choose any letter of the alphabet, followed by a colon. The exception to this is a two-letter series label, in which the first letter represents a series that encompasses more than just one topic. For example, CH is an example of a series label that applies across an entire chapter. The H can be replaced with another letter, but you must keep the C in order to use this command. Finally, it's important to note that a series label must always be the first element in an autonumber format.
    • Show File Commands Displays only the file commands in the area below. These include commands that let you incorporate different parts of a file (such as the file name, file path, and file extension) in an autonumber format.
    • Show Format Commands Displays only the format commands in the area below. These include commands such as {b}, {i}, {color red}, and {size 12pt}, which let you determine how an autonumber format will look. Many of these commands require a beginning command (e.g., {b}) and an ending command (e.g., {/b}).
    • Show Page Commands Displays only the page commands in the area below. These let you include the page number and count in an autonumber format.
    • Show Text Commands Displays only the text commands in the area below. These commands let you incorporate text from an area of your output into the autonumber format.
  10. In the Enter format field, provide the autonumber format for the style. This format can be a combination of text that you type and automated commands that you select. To add a command to the "Enter format" field, double-click it from the list in the area below.

    Example If you want the autonumber to include text (such as "Table" or "Figure"), simply type it in this field. You can also double-click any of the commands below to add them to this field. For example, you might want to add a counter that increments the autonumbers by one (e.g., Figure 1, Figure 2, Figure 3). The command for this is {n+}. Descriptions for each command are displayed in the list.

    Some commands include a start tag and an end tag. For example, if you want a portion of the autonumber format be displayed in bold, you would place your cursor in the "Enter format" field where you want to start the bold font and double-click b in the list below. Then place your cursor where you want the bold font to end and double-click /b from the list.

    So in the end, your autonumber format might include a combination of text and multiple commands, such as: {b}Table {n+} - {/b}.

    Following are descriptions of the commands that are available.

    Note If you plan to generate Word output from your project, you should not use the format commands provided in the grid, since they are not supported in Word. Instead, create and apply a span class to the autonumber format to change its look. To create a span class, open the Stylesheet Editor, select the span tag on the left side of the editor, and follow the steps for adding a selector (e.g., span.BoldRed). Then on the style using the autonumber, enter the name of the class in the mc-auto-auto-number-class field.

    So instead of doing this…

    Do this instead…

    Autonumber Commands

    • {n} Retains the current counter value and displays it. You might use this command, for example, if you are applying autonumber formats to multi-level paragraphs, where one paragraph acts as the "parent" to another. Let's say the first-level paragraphs are numbered like this: 1.0, 2.0, 3.0. If you want the second level paragraphs to keep the first number of its parent paragraph and increment the second number (e.g., 1.1, 1.2, 1.3), you would enter the {n} command to continue displaying that first number, which represents the parent paragraph (in this case, 1).
    • {n=1} Resets the counter value to 1 and displays it. You can replace the number 1 with any other number that you want to use.
    • { =0} Resets the counter value to 0 but does not display it. You can replace the number 0 with any other number that you want to use.
    • {n+} Increments the counter value and displays it. You might use this command, for example, to increment a list of step-by-step procedures (e.g., 1., 2., 3.).
    • { } Retains the current value and does not display it. Make sure to include a space between the brackets. You might use this command, for example, if you are creating an outline with Roman numerals at the first level and uppercase alpha numerals at the second level. If you are creating the format for the second level, you want the autonumber format to keep track of the fact that it is a "child" of the first level paragraph, but you do not want to display the Roman numeral from it (e.g., IV.A.). Instead, you only want to display the uppercase alpha letter (e.g., A). In order to do this, you would insert the { } command at the place where the Roman numeral would normally be displayed.
    • {secnum} Displays the current section number. You can use this command if you are creating online output, or Word or PDF output.

      Note To generate section numbers, you need to create an autonumber format that includes the {secnum} command. Then you need to specify section breaks in the outline TOC. See Specifying Chapter and Page Layout Breaks.

      Note You can also insert Section Number variables into page layout headers. By doing this, you can automatically display the correct section number at the top or bottom of pages in the output. See Inserting Chapter, Section, and Volume Number Variables Into Frames.

    • {chapnum} Displays the current chapter number.

      Note To generate chapter numbers, you need to create an autonumber format that includes the {chapnum} command. Then you need to specify chapter breaks in the outline TOC. See Specifying Chapter and Page Layout Breaks.

      Note You can also insert Chapter Number variables into page layout headers. By doing this, you can automatically display the correct chapter number at the top or bottom of pages in the output. See Inserting Chapter, Section, and Volume Number Variables Into Frames.

    • {volnum} Displays the current volume number.

      Note To generate volume numbers, you need to create an autonumber format that includes the {volnum} command. Second, you need to specify chapter breaks in the outline TOC (see Specifying Chapter and Page Layout Breaks). Third, you need to specify the autonumber flow for each volume, resetting the volume number to a specific number (see Specifying Autonumbering Flow for Output).

      Note You can also insert Volume Number variables into page layout headers. By doing this, you can automatically display the correct volume number at the top or bottom of pages in the output. See Inserting Chapter, Section, and Volume Number Variables Into Frames.

    • {r} This is the same as the {n} command, except it displays the counter as a lowercase Roman numeral. You can replace the "n" with an "r" in any of the commands listed above.
    • {R} This is the same as the {n} command, except it displays the counter as an uppercase Roman numeral. You can replace the "n" with an "R" in any of the commands listed above.
    • {a} This is the same as the {n} command, except it displays the counter as a lowercase alpha letter. You can replace the "n" with an "a" in any of the commands listed above.
    • {A} This is the same as the {n} command, except it displays the counter as an uppercase alpha letter. You can replace the "n" with an "A" in any of the commands listed above.
    • {Sn} This is a counter to be used over the course of an entire section. This specific command retains the current counter value and displays it. However, you can modify it to create custom versions of any of the commands that you see above with {n}. For example, you might want to use {Sn+} or {Sn=1}.
    • {Cn} This is a counter to be used over the course of an entire chapter. This specific command retains the current counter value and displays it. However, you can modify it to create custom versions of any of the commands that you see above with {n}. For example, you might want to use {Cn+} or {Cn=1}.
    • {Gn} This is a counter to be used globally in your content. This specific command retains the current counter value and displays it. However, you can modify it to create custom versions of any of the commands that you see above with {n}. For example, you might want to use {Gn+} or {Gn=1}.
    • H: Specifies a series labeled H. However, you can use any letter of the alphabet for a series label, and you can use several different series labels throughout your content. For example, you might want to use F: for a series of figure captions, or T: for a series of table captions. If you use a series label, it must be first in the autonumber format.
    • SH: Specifies a section-wide series labeled H. However, you can use any letter of the alphabet as the second letter (replacing H). For example, you might want to use SF: for a section-wide series of figure captions, or ST: for a section-wide series of table captions. If you use a series label, it must be first in the autonumber format.
    • CH: Specifies a chapter-wide series labeled H. However, you can use any letter of the alphabet as the second letter (replacing H). For example, you might want to use CF: for a chapter-wide series of figure captions, or CT: for a chapter-wide series of table captions. If you use a series label, it must be first in the autonumber format.
    • GH: Specifies a global series labeled H. However, you can use any letter of the alphabet as the second letter (replacing H). For example, you might want to use GF: for a global series of figure captions, or GT: for a global series of table captions. If you use a series label, it must be first in the autonumber format.

    File Commands

    • {ext} Displays the file extension.
    • {file} Displays the file name, including the extension.
    • {filename} Displays the file name, without the extension.
    • {path} Displays the path of the file.
    • {url} Displays the path of the file, URL syntax.

    Format Commands

    • {b} Starts bold text.
    • {/b} Ends bold text.
    • {bg red} Starts new background color. You can replace "red" with another color.
    • {/bg} Ends the background color.
    • {color red} Starts new text color. You can replace "red" with another color.
    • {/color} Ends the text color.
    • {default} Resets all font changes.
    • {family Courier New} Starts a new font family. You can replace "Courier New" with another font family.
    • {/family} Ends font family.
    • {i} Starts italic text.
    • {/i} Ends italic text.
    • {size 12pt} Starts font size. You can replace "12pt" with another font size.
    • {/size} Ends font size.
    • {sub} Starts subscript text.
    • {/sub} Ends subscript text.
    • {sup} Starts superscript text.
    • {/sup} Ends superscript text.
    • {u} Starts underline text.
    • {/u} Ends underline text.

    Page Commands

    • {page} Displays the page number.
    • {pagecount} Displays the page count.

    Text Commands

  11. Click OK. The dialog closes.
  12. You can enter settings for the other autonumber format properties in the Stylesheet Editor.
    • mc-autonumber-class You can enter a span style class for the autonumber format.
    • mc-autonumber-offset You can specify the amount of space that you want to create between a format's content and the paragraph content. Select Length in the top drop-down list. You can then enter an amount and choose from several different units of measurement (points, pixels, centimeters, etc.). See Units of Measurement. Click OK when you are done.
    • mc-autonumber-position You can select the position for the autonumber format in the paragraph.

      • float-left The autonumber format is placed to the left of the paragraph content, in alignment with the left side of the page frame.
      • float-right The autonumber format is placed to the right of the paragraph content, in alignment with the right side of the page frame.
      • inside-head The autonumber format is placed before the paragraph content, inside the content area. Text that is wrapped to the next line will align under the autonumber format.
      • inside-tail The autonumber format is placed after the paragraph content, inside the content area. Text that is wrapped to the next line will align under the autonumber format.
      • none The autonumber functionality (autonumbers, counters, and formatting) are removed from the class, while the other class properties are preserved.
      • outside-frame The autonumber format is placed outside the page layout frame holding the paragraph.
      • outside-head The autonumber format is placed before the paragraph content, but outside of the content area. Therefore, text that is wrapped to the next line will align under the previous text (not under the autonumber format). You can provide space between the format and the content by using the "mc-autonumber-offset" property.
      • outside-tail The autonumber format is placed after the paragraph content, but outside of the content area. Therefore, text that is wrapped to the next line will align under the previous text (not under the autonumber format). You can provide space between the format and the content by using the "mc-autonumber-offset" property.
  13. Click to save your work.

What’s Next?

After you create an autonumber format for a style, you need to apply the style to the appropriate content. See Applying Styles to Content.

If you have created autonumber formats that include volume, chapter, or section numbers, you need to specify their flow for the output. See Specifying Autonumbering Flow for Output.