Creating Rounded Borders on Paragraphs and Tables

For most output formats, you can use CSS3 border-radius style properties to create rounded borders on block elements, such as paragraphs and blockquotes. You can also use set rounded borders on tables.

Rounded Borders and Block Elements

The properties for block elements are available in the Stylesheet Editor and in other areas of the user interface, such as the Paragraph Properties dialog.

Rounded Borders and Tables

For tables, you can set rounded borders in either a regular stylesheet or in a special table stylesheet. You can also set them locally in the Table Properties dialog.

Regular Stylesheet

By setting rounded borders on the table style in a regular stylesheet, all of your tables will have the rounded borders.

Table Stylesheet

If you set rounded borders in a special table stylesheet, using the Table Style Editor, only the tables using that stylesheet will have rounded borders.

Additional Required Settings for Rounded Borders on Tables

When setting rounded borders on tables, it is essential that you also set two other style properties.

First, you must set the border-collapse property to "separate" (in a regular stylesheet) or "Do not collapse cell borders" (in a table stylesheet or the Table Properties dialog).

Second, you must set the overflow property to "hidden." This property prevents a background color in the table from obstructing the rounded corners, thus making the table look as if it still has square corners.

However, Internet Explorer does not respect the overflow setting in tables. So the only way to ensure your tables appear to have rounded borders in Internet Explorer is to not have a background color in the cells at the four corners of the table.

Example You have set up a table stylesheet to use rounded corners. If you view the output on a Chrome browser, it looks like this:

As you can see, the rounded borders are shown.

But then you view the same table in Internet Explorer. It looks like this:

Notice that the rounded corners are obstructed by the background color.

To solve this issue, you remove the background colors from the table. After you do that, the table looks like this in Internet Explorer, as well as in other browsers:

If you do not want to lose your background color, you might consider creating your tables without an outer border. That way, the rounded borders will still be shown in most browsers and in PDF output, and in Internet Explorer the tables will simply appear with square corners.

Example You have a table with a colored background, but without outer borders. With rounded corners it looks like this in most newer browsers:

And in Internet Explorer it looks like this:

.

How to Use a Style to Set Rounded Borders on Block Elements

  1. From the Content Explorer, open the stylesheet that you want to modify.

  2. Complete one of the following sets of steps, depending on whether you want to use the Simplified view or Advanced view in the Stylesheet Editor.

    • Simplified The Simplified view displays styles in a grid view and is often best for brand new users.

      This view provides an easy way to apply properties to styles, with format options available from a toolbar and dialogs (similar to the way one would use an interface such as Microsoft Word). In some cases, only the most common property options are available in the Simplified view (e.g., font, letter/word spacing, paragraph alignment/indentation, autonumbering format, borders, background). One advantage of the Simplified view is that you can apply a property to multiple styles at the same time. You can also click a check box to hide the properties in the editor, allowing you to see only the styles.

    • Advanced The Advanced view displays styles in a tree structure, and despite the name, is user friendly for authors of all levels.

      For the properties, you can toggle between a grouped display and an alphabetical display. The Advanced view of the Stylesheet Editor lets you edit more settings than are available in the Simplified view. In addition, the Advanced view lets you see and apply settings to multiple mediums and media queries at the same time.

    Warning Mediums can be used if you want to use one group of settings for online output types and another group of settings for print-based output types. For example, you might use the default medium for your online outputs and the print medium for your print outputs.  From the Medium drop-down in the Stylesheet Editor, make sure the proper medium is selected before you begin. In the Advanced view, you can open multiple mediums at once; you just need to look at the title at the top of the medium pane and make sure you are working in the correct one. If you are not using stylesheet mediums for your different outputs or if you want all mediums to have the same settings, just leave the medium set to default and continue. Please note that Flare remembers the last medium that you used when working in the stylesheet, so it may or may not be the one that you want to use the next time around. See Mediums and Media Queries.

    If Using Simplified View

    1. In the local toolbar, make sure the first button displays (which means that the Simplified view is currently shown in the editor). If the button displays instead, then click it.
    2. In the upper-left corner of the Stylesheet Editor, click in the drop-down field and select .
    3. Select the appropriate paragraph style. For example, you can select the parent p tag, or you can select a class that you may have created for that tag (e.g., p.Tip, p.Note).
    4. In the local toolbar of the editor, click . The Properties dialog opens.
    5. Select the Borders tab.
    6. Set the options in the Border Radius section.

      1. Click in any of the individual fields (Top-Left, Top-Right, Bottom-Right, Bottom-Left) to specify the settings for a particular corner of the block element. If you click the down arrow to the right of all the fields, the settings will be applied to all of the fields.

        When you click that down arrow or in one of the individual fields, a small popup displays.

        This popup has two halves. You can complete only the left side of the popup if you like. This will create a curve that is equal horizontally and vertically. If you want a border to have more of a curve either horizontally or vertically, you can complete the fields in the right half of the popup as well, so that you have two values (e.g., 10px 15px) instead of one. For more information on using two sets of border radius properties, see css3.info/preview/rounded-border/.

      2. Use the lower-left area of the popup to enter a number for the amount of curve. The greater the number, the more curve that is applied.
      3. Use the area to the right of the number field to select a unit of measurement (e.g., point, pixel, centimeter).
      4. If you want to provide a second value for the rounded border, complete the same fields on the right half of the popup.
      5. Click OK.
    7. In the Properties dialog, click OK.

    If Using Advanced View

    1. In the local toolbar, make sure the first button displays . If the button displays instead, then click it.
    2. In the upper-left corner of the Stylesheet Editor, click in the drop-down field and select .
    3. Select the appropriate paragraph style. For example, you can select the parent p tag, or you can select a class that you may have created for that tag (e.g., p.Tip, p.Note).
    4. From the Show drop-down list on the upper-right side of the editor, select .
    5. (Optional) You can use the toggle button in the local toolbar to show properties below in a group view or an alphabetical view .
    6. If you are using the grouped view, expand the Border group. 
    7. Locate and select the border-radius property that you want to change. Each corner (bottom-left, bottom-right, top-left, top-right) can be set separately (e.g., border-bottom-left-radius, border-top-right-radius). Even better, you can set the main border-radius property, which lets you specify the amount of curve for all four corners in one place.
    8. The area to the right of the property is used for selecting and entering values. If you know how to enter the information correctly, you can click in the value field and type it directly. Otherwise, click the ellipsis button to the right of the property. Depending on the type of property, the appropriate controls and options display, allowing you to choose or enter values (e.g., select from a drop-down list, click a button, complete fields in a dialog or popup). If you completed values in a popup, click OK at the bottom of the box.

      In the popup, you can enter the amount of curve you want in the H field (for Horizontal) and the V field (for Vertical). If you are setting values for the main border-radius property, you will see a small icon in the upper-left corner of the popup. If you click this icon, the popup changes, showing individual H and V fields for the four corners (Top Left, Top Right, Bottom Left, Bottom Right). For more information on using multiple sets of border radius properties, see www.css3.info/preview/rounded-border/.

    9. If you are using the grouped view, expand the Table group. 
    10. For the border-collapse property, select separate.
    11. If you are using the grouped view, expand the Positioning group. 
    12. For the overflow property, select hidden.
  3. Click to save your work.

How to Use Local Formatting to Set Rounded Borders on Block Elements

  1. Open the content file.
  2. Click on the paragraph that you want to modify.
  1. Do one of the following, depending on the part of the user interface you are using:
    • Ribbon Select Home > (at the bottom of the Paragraph section).

    • Keyboard Shortcut Press CTRL+ALT+B.
    • Right-Click Right-click on the paragraph and from the context menu choose Paragraph.

    The Paragraph Properties dialog opens.

  2. Select the Borders tab.
  3. Set the options in the Border Radius section.

    1. Click in any of the individual fields (Top-Left, Top-Right, Bottom-Right, Bottom-Left) to specify the settings for a particular corner of the block element. If you click the down arrow to the right of all the fields, the settings will be applied to all of the fields.

      When you click that down arrow or in one of the individual fields, a small popup displays.

      This popup has two halves. You can complete only the left side of the popup if you like. This will create a curve that is equal horizontally and vertically. If you want a border to have more of a curve either horizontally or vertically, you can complete the fields in the right half of the popup as well, so that you have two values (e.g., 10px 15px) instead of one. For more information on using two sets of border radius properties, see css3.info/preview/rounded-border/.

    2. Use the lower-left area of the popup to enter a number for the amount of curve. The greater the number, the more curve that is applied.
    3. Use the area to the right of the number field to select a unit of measurement (e.g., point, pixel, centimeter).
    4. If you want to provide a second value for the rounded border, complete the same fields on the right half of the popup.
    5. Click OK.
  4. In the Paragraph Properties dialog, click OK.
  5. Click to save your work.

How to Use a Table Stylesheet to Set Rounded Borders on Tables

  1. Open the table stylesheet that you want to edit. This can be found in the Resources > TableStyles subfolder in the Content Explorer, but you can store table stylesheets in other folders in the Content Explorer if you like.
  2. In the Table Style Editor, select the General tab.
  3. In the Cell Border Collapse area, select Do not collapse cell borders.
  4. Set the options in the Border Radius section.

    1. Click in any of the individual fields (Top-Left, Top-Right, Bottom-Right, Bottom-Left) to specify the settings for a particular corner of the table. If you click the down arrow to the right of all the fields, the settings will be applied to all of the fields.

      When you click that down arrow or in one of the individual fields, a small popup displays.

      This popup has two halves. You can complete only the left side of the popup if you like. This will create a curve that is equal horizontally and vertically. If you want a border to have more of a curve either horizontally or vertically, you can complete the fields in the right half of the popup as well, so that you have two values (e.g., 10px 15px) instead of one. For more information on using two sets of border radius properties, see css3.info/preview/rounded-border/.

    2. Use the lower-left area of the popup to enter a number for the amount of curve. The greater the number, the more curve that is applied.
    3. Use the area to the right of the number field to select a unit of measurement (e.g., point, pixel, centimeter).
    4. If you want to provide a second value for the rounded border, complete the same fields on the right half of the popup.
    5. Click OK.
  5. Scroll down to the bottom of the tab, and in the Advanced area, click in the Overflow drop-down and select Hidden.
  6. Click to save your work.

How to Use Local Formatting to Set Rounded Borders on Tables

  1. Open the content file.
  2. Click inside the table.
  3. Do one of the following, depending on the part of the user interface you are using:
    • Ribbon Select Home > Table Properties.

    • Right-click Right-click the table and from the context menu, select Table Properties.
  4. Select the General tab.
  5. In the Cell Border Collapse area, select Do not collapse cell borders.
  6. Set the options in the Border Radius section.

    1. Click in any of the individual fields (Top-Left, Top-Right, Bottom-Right, Bottom-Left) to specify the settings for a particular corner of the table. If you click the down arrow to the right of all the fields, the settings will be applied to all of the fields.

      When you click that down arrow or in one of the individual fields, a small popup displays.

      This popup has two halves. You can complete only the left side of the popup if you like. This will create a curve that is equal horizontally and vertically. If you want a border to have more of a curve either horizontally or vertically, you can complete the fields in the right half of the popup as well, so that you have two values (e.g., 10px 15px) instead of one. For more information on using two sets of border radius properties, see css3.info/preview/rounded-border/.

    2. Use the lower-left area of the popup to enter a number for the amount of curve. The greater the number, the more curve that is applied.
    3. Use the area to the right of the number field to select a unit of measurement (e.g., point, pixel, centimeter).
    4. If you want to provide a second value for the rounded border, complete the same fields on the right half of the popup.
    5. Click OK.
  7. In the Advanced area, click in the Overflow drop-down and select Hidden.
  8. In the Table Properties dialog, click OK.
  9. Click to save your work.

What’s Noteworthy?

Note Some older browsers may not support rounded borders, so even if you create the rounded borders for your content, they may display as rounded in some browsers but square in others.

Note Different browsers display different results if you have all of the following set on a table: a caption, rounded borders, and a color in the background of the first row. That's because some browsers consider the caption part of the table and others do not. One possible workaround is to set the border-top-left-radius and border-top-right-radius on the top-left and top-right cells.

Note You can also set rounded borders on page layout frames. See Specifying Frame Borders.

What’s Next?

After editing a style, you can apply it to content in a topic or snippet. See Applying Styles to Content.